Festival News

Official Selection 2018: Feature Films

The Cape Town International Film Market and Festival is proud to announce the official selection of feature films for the 2018 edition of the festival. Festival screenings are open to the public and will run from 10 – 19 October at various cinemas within the V&A Waterfront, including free family-friendly films at the Amphitheatre.

 

The program is a cinematic feast with some 120 world-class films on show to the public, festival delegates, and the jury.  The meticulously curated selection will include a significant amount of African content amongst the independent feature films, short films and documentaries on show.  Particular focus areas are New Voices (first-time feature directors), That’s So Gay (new LGBTQ releases), and Cinema of Conscience.

 

This year’s selection is full of powerful and entertaining films that together celebrate the diversity and uniqueness of cultures and stories from all over the world.

 

Ticket sales open on 1 October.

 

CTIFMF Festival Director Leon van der Merwe has this to say of this year’s selection,

 

“This year we will present more films, including short and feature documentaries, submitted by film makers from more than 78 countries around the world. From the more than 700 entries we received more than 80 Feature Films, 20 documentaries and 66 short films were selected.  It was encouraging to see more filmmakers from Africa submitting their films to the film festival and supports our theme of create collaborate and celebrate.

Woman in film and also woman film directors rose in their numbers since last year. We celebrate and congratulate the extraordinary group of talented filmmakers who have employed their skills and craft in the exploration of social, cultural, economic and political subjects. We are extremely excited for this year’s festival. We believe that the CTIFMF provides one more outlet to local and international filmmakers.”

 

Films that will screen include a range of World Premieres and the festival will play host to a number of respected filmmakers from across South Africa, the rest of the continent, and the globe.

 

Films from as far afield as Japan, Turkey, Iran, Indonesia, Russia, Germany, Romania, the UK, Indonesia and the Philippines will be joined from a selection from across Africa including Ghana, Sudan, Sierra Leone, Kenya, Niger, and Tanzania.

 

Kenya is especially well represented by two films; the much celebrated film Rafiki (watch the trailer),  from the multi-award winning director Kanuri Kahiu, along with the beautifully moving Supa Modo (watch the trailer), directed by Likarion Wainain.

 

Rafiki (“Friend”)was inspired by Ugandan Monica Arac de Nyeko‘s 2007 Caine Prize Winning short story “Jambula Tree”, Rafiki is the story of friendship and tender love that grows between two young women, Kena and Ziki, amidst family and political pressures. The film had its international premiere in the Un Certain Regard section at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival. Rafiki was banned by the Kenya’s Film and Classification Board (KFCB) due to its homosexual theme, which in Kenya is contrary to the law.

 

Supa Modo tell the story of a young girl whose dream of becoming a superhero is threatened by terminal illness, inspiring her village to rally together to make her dream come true. This uplifting debut film  for Likarion Wainana has won 7 awards in various International Film Festivals.

 

South Africa is strongly represented with no less than 10 South African feature films in competition. Amongst these are:

 

Captive (Ko nkanga), from Director David Kabale tells the story of an immigrant woman, who after moving into her aunt’s house, experiences sexual abuse at the hands of her in law. She must now make a choice of whether to submit or fight.

 

Joseph Jones Umba’s Epiphany is a thoroughly modern story. After a clerical insemination error, an acquiescent woman must choose between her conservative husband and a child that has eluded her for so long.

 

Included in the selection is also a strong contingent of women filmmakers, including the World Premiere event for the film Cut Out Girls, a Cape Town made South African film from director Nicola Hanekom that is is loosely based on her award winning stage play that deals with the uneasy subject of date rape.

 

The coming of age tale from Iranian filmmaker Sadaf Foroughi, Ava has won multiple awards including the Toronto International Film Festival 2017 and the Discovery – International Critics’ Award (FIPRESCI). Watch the trailer to Ava.

 

Other noteworthy films include from the Philippines, The Eternity Between Seconds and The Great Buddah+. The Eternity Between Seconds is a romance about two strangers who meet in Korea and form an intimate relationship as they bond over their loneliness, conversations and neuroses and is directed by Alec Figuracion. Watch the trailer to The Eternity Between Seconds.

 

The Great Buddah+ is Tawain director Hsin-yao Huang’s film that has won 15 awards in various International Film Festivals and is an almost comical tale that involves gods, middle-aged men’s sexual desire and the conversation between ghosts and humans. Watch the trailer to The Great Buddah+.

 

The Harvesters (Die Stropers), a South African entry within the LGBTQ section and is a 2018 internationally co-produced film written and directed by Etienne Kallos. The film presents a new generation of Afrikaans youths coming of age in contemporary Africa through the story of a teenager living on his parents’ remote cattle farm. Watch a clip to The Harvesters (Die Stropers).

 

For a full list and information on all the feature films that will be screening at this year’s CTIFMF, please visit the website, www.filmfestival.capetown.

 

Information and official announcements of the short films and documentary films, screening schedules and ticket information will all be made soon.

 

The Cape Town International Film Market and Festival is proudly hosted by the City of Cape Town.

CTIFMF announces Initial Market Program

The Cape Town International Film Market and Festival 2018 Initial Market Program Announced

                   

 

The 2018 edition of the Cape Town International Film Market and Festival will take place from October 9th – 19th 2018 at venues across the V & A Waterfront in Cape Town.  This year’s edition will feature an expanded and content focused market, led by the recently appointed Market Director Elias Ribeiro.

 

The CTIFMF has reached out to various industry stakeholders in a collaborative effort in keeping with its theme, of CREATE, COLLABORATE, CELEBRATE, to develop a program with tangible outcomes and a view to the long term growth of the industry both regionally and across the continent.

 

A number of key programs have been finalized, all designed to maximize opportunities for emerging talent and to establish long term inclusive programs.

 

Elias Ribeiro explains further, “As the CTIFMF, learning from many who have paved the way, we have taken great care in crafting an offering that is complementary to current industry offerings. We hope to strengthen our bonds with partners such as the Durban Film Mart and together foster a dynamic and vibrant ecosystem that will contribute to assertive impact in film projects, our financial instruments and funders, policy designers and audiovisual makers at large. We also have prioritised an Audience Development program called Engage, with the faith we will in the long term make local films more sustainable in the domestic market.”

 

Marketing Director of the CTIFMF Jehad Kasu has this to say of the program, “It is the vision of the CTIFMF to reposition South Africa’s film industry offering through meaningful industry collaboration. If we harness our collective resources we can achieve an infinite amount of collective growth and success. This will of course take a reasonable amount of time and commitment to achieve. So we implore all film industry stakeholders new, established, private and state owned to support one another and become active participants in elevating the presence and contribution of the South African film industry within the global ecosystem.

 

WIP (Works in Progress)

 

As the most important element of a market is its content, the CTIFMF has developed a program that aims to elevate the bar for African content in terms of quality and innovation. A maximum of six works in progress will be selected from the African continent to show to international industry experts. High calibre decision makers and experts will be hand-picked to view the selected films and then give detailed feedback, with the goal of increasing the artistic quality and challenging the core creative teams to think about audiences beyond their own territories.

 

This initial viewing will be followed by a screening of a segment of the same works to a wider audience of invited industry stakeholders comprising of festival programmers, sales companies, distributors and post production financiers. The WIP program will disburse finishing awards to the most promising projects: grading, final sound mix, VFX, online editing, subtitling and DCPs, with the generous support of South African post production facilities such as Priest Post, Rhapsody, The Refinery and The Work Room Audio Post.

 

We have confirmed attendance from Berlinale’s European Film Market and Berlinale Africa Hub, Tribeca, TIFF, London BFI; international sales companies such as Pyramide International, Flourishing Films, Talent Agents Casarotto and Curtis Brown, Mnet, Indigenous Films, Ster Kinekor, and Post Production South Africa.

 

Entries are due no later than August 10th. For full details visit www.filmfest.capetown or email zahrah@filmfest.capetown.

 

ENGAGE

 

Considering that one of the most challenging and pressing issues for local films is to earn the trust of local audiences that then translates into box office success, the CTIFMF will have a special focus on audience design and development.

 

A group of marketing and industry experts with an understanding of these challenges will be convened for a three-day workshop under the guidance of Valeria Richter. This outcome based workshop will equip these professionals with the most current and powerful tools designed to assist films in finding their target market and core following.

 

At the end of the workshop, each participant will be assigned a project from the WIP and will be expected to deliver an Audience Design Strategy, with a cash prize awarded to the most prolific two of the lot to craft an Audience Design Strategy in collaboration with the Festival Board for CTIFMF 2019.

 

Aimed at publicists, marketing and sales professionals, distributors and others within the field, applications are open until August 17th.  More details on the program, outcomes and prize can be found at www.filmfest.capetown, or email zahrah@filmfest.capetown.

 

 

 

ADAPT

 

CTIFMF’s Adapt program will bring together creatives, producers, and rights holders from the publishing and film industries to explore the possibilities of cinematic book adaptations as well as to develop an economic model and business practice around this that accounts for our African realities.

 

A number of toolbox sessions and workshops will be led by Selina Ukwuoma on translating from book to screen. She is no newcomer to South Africa as she has been working closely with Realness as well as Talents Durban over the past 3 years.

 

Selina is a freelance script consultant who began her career at literary agency Curtis Brown working on a number of adaptations including 2008 BAFTA winner BOY A. She has since gone on to advise on award-winning indie films such as 2014 Teddy winner THE WAY HE LOOKS and this year’s Goyas triumph SUMMER 1993, both Foreign Language Oscars entries from their respective countries.

 

The industry program of the CTIFMF will see 4 days of panel discussions, keynote speeches  and workshops with participation from experts from South Africa, the rest of Africa, and across the globe.  There will be a variety of relevant topics covered, all aimed at inclusive and constructive dialogues that foster the development of a cohesive and continually developing film industry. These topics include mentorship, financing, AR/VR, animation, blockchain and crypto currency.

 

For more information, submissions material list and to download application forms: www.filmfest.capetown

 

Call for Entries 2018

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Call for Entries 2018

[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1615″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]The registration booths at the 2017 festival.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

The 2018 Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) will take place from October 9th – 19th 2018. This year’s edition will build significantly on the successes of last year with an increased focus on collaboration and the celebration of the local, regional, pan-African, and international film industries.

Through various collaborations we will be supporting colleagues, promoting our own stories, and finding innovative solutions together, creating an enabling environment for growth and development for filmmakers across Africa.

The CTIFMF through a variety of programs that will be announced in the upcoming months will be the pivot on which we will endeavor to exponentially grow the distribution of African content across the world.

Having set itself the goal of leading the transformation of the film industry in Africa, the CTIFMF is excited to announce the first and most fundamental stepping stone to achieving this goal: the official opening of the call for film submissions for the CTIFMF 2018.

Filmmakers from all over the world are invited to submit their films in the following categories: feature films, documentary, animation and short films. We especially encourage producers, directors and script writers from South Africa and Africa who are creating local/African content to submit high quality entries into competition.

This year’s CTIFMF will present an exciting and diverse array of quality films that showcase the immense talent of filmmakers from the region, the country, the continent and beyond.

Only films completed not more than 18 months prior to the Call for Entries of the Cape Town International Film Market & Festival will be considered for competition purposes.

Films completed before this time will be eligible for screening in the Panorama Section but not considered for the competition section. Awards in the competition section are as follows:

FILM AWARDS
Grand Prix
Best Director
Best New Director
Best Actor
Best Actress
Best Script
Best Cinematography
Best Editing
Best Documentary Feature
Best Short Film
Best Animation Short Film
Best South African Feature Film
Best South African Short Film
Audience Award for Best Film at the Festival

Deadlines
May 1, 2018 Opening Date
July 10, 2018 Regular Deadline
July 31, 2018 Final Deadline
August 7, 2018 Notification Date
October 9 – 19, 2018 Event Date

Please visit the link below for the Entry Form, Rules & Regulations:

CTIFMF FILMFREEWAY

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507728991209{padding-top: 75px !important;padding-right: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 75px !important;padding-left: 20px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-lg vc_hidden-md”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Call for Entries 2018

[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1615″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]The registration booths at the 2017 festival.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

The 2018 Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) will take place from October 9th – 19th 2018. This year’s edition will build significantly on the successes of last year with an increased focus on collaboration and the celebration of the local, regional, pan-African, and international film industries.

Through various collaborations we will be supporting colleagues, promoting our own stories, and finding innovative solutions together, creating an enabling environment for growth and development for filmmakers across Africa.

The CTIFMF through a variety of programs that will be announced in the upcoming months will be the pivot on which we will endeavor to exponentially grow the distribution of African content across the world.

Having set itself the goal of leading the transformation of the film industry in Africa, the CTIFMF is excited to announce the first and most fundamental stepping stone to achieving this goal: the official opening of the call for film submissions for the CTIFMF 2018.

Filmmakers from all over the world are invited to submit their films in the following categories: feature films, documentary, animation and short films. We especially encourage producers, directors and script writers from South Africa and Africa who are creating local/African content to submit high quality entries into competition.

This year’s CTIFMF will present an exciting and diverse array of quality films that showcase the immense talent of filmmakers from the region, the country, the continent and beyond.

Only films completed not more than 18 months prior to the Call for Entries of the Cape Town International Film Market & Festival will be considered for competition purposes.

Films completed before this time will be eligible for screening in the Panorama Section but not considered for the competition section. Awards in the competition section are as follows:

FILM AWARDS
Grand Prix
Best Director
Best New Director
Best Actor
Best Actress
Best Script
Best Cinematography
Best Editing
Best Documentary Feature
Best Short Film
Best Animation Short Film
Best South African Feature Film
Best South African Short Film
Audience Award for Best Film at the Festival

Deadlines
May 1, 2018 Opening Date
July 10, 2018 Regular Deadline
July 31, 2018 Final Deadline
August 7, 2018 Notification Date
October 9 – 19, 2018 Event Date

Please visit the link below for the Entry Form, Rules & Regulations:

CTIFMF FILMFREEWAY

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What if Cape Town becomes the Cannes of Africa?

[vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507728981817{padding-top: 75px !important;padding-right: 150px !important;padding-bottom: 75px !important;padding-left: 150px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-sm vc_hidden-xs”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

What if Cape Town becomes the Cannes of Africa?

 

CAPE ARGUS / OPINION[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1454″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Ste George’s Mall, Bo-Kaap or Langa. This kind of promotion attracts international visitors, says the writer. Picture: Tracey Adams/ANA[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]Cape Town – Imaginative stories start with a “what if” moment – a proposition that propels the viewer into the perspective of the hero of the story. This is true of movies, and, in many ways, this is paralleled in truly creative business ventures. Such is the case of the Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) 2017.

From relatively humble beginnings in 2007 as the Cape Town and Winelands International Film Festival, the long-term vision of the event’s organisers has seen it grow an increasing reputation as the place to promote the film and television industry.

Every year the phrase “flock to Cannes” is used by the media to describe the mass migration of media specialists to the Cannes Film Festival. That’s a “what if” proposition for us in the Cape: what if our international profile on the film and television market could rival the very best, becoming the Cannes of Africa?

In generating global interest in a local event, we could see the benefits of the tourism that results being spread widely across the city, in the same way that it is through other large events and festivals. It takes a “Cannes-do” attitude!

This year’s CTIFM takes place from October12-21, and is all the more important as it’s headed by Rafiq Samsodien, a local from the Cape Flats who has not only had the honour of having produced an Oscar-nominated movie, he’s also immersed in the film industry where he works alongside some of the world’s best.

He’s gone on to champion the local film industry, and at every turn he’s proving to the world what we already believe: we’re capable and creative – asking those big “what if” questions and then using ingenuity and hard work to realise our dreams.

Staging a successful annual event isn’t easy; we can’t really say that an event grows like a snowball in our Cape context – a more effective metaphor would be to say that it is built brick by brick, year on year.

Success builds on success. Did the original organisers of what has now become the Cape Town International Jazz Festival ever believe that it would become the biggest event in the city’s calendar?

Perhaps that was their “what if” intention, it doesn’t really matter. Their hard work has translated to an event that attracts 34 000 festival attendees, generating a R553.4million economic injection into the local economy, creating 2 000 more temporary jobs than existed before it was around.

Similarly, Design Indaba (2014) proved that it could carry the clout to live up to expectations, with 25 000 expo delegates, 367 exhibitors and a R326m economic boost.

The Cape Town Cycle Tour this year attracted 4 000 international entries, and generated R500m towards the economy, according to tour organisers. A modest look at tourism spend says that an international visitor is enjoying the exchange rate: last year, the average international visitor spend, not including accommodation, came to R1 198 per day. They stayed for an average of three to four days, and some for much longer.

Research company Forward Keys has forecast a 14% increase year on year in arrivals to the city in October, when CTIFMF will take place (based on bookings), and many of those visitors will be here to enjoy what will be a remarkable event.

Earlier this year the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA) ranked Cape Town as the number one city in Africa for business tourism, and the City now ranks in the top 40 destinations for business tourism in the world – improving 15 places in the global rankings from 54th place in 2015 to 39th place last year.

According to a Grant Thornton economic assessment done as part of the bid process, hosting the Rugby World Cup in 2023 would bring South Africa R27.3 billion in direct, indirect and induced economic impact. It would also sustain 38 600 annual job equivalents – some temporary and some permanent.

Business, sport, film: all have this in common: “what if” propositions that have led to action, action that has collectively contributed billions to our economy every year. This is a cash injection that benefits all of us as it allows for continued infrastructural growth.

The film industry is built on immense sums of money, investors believe in projects that take hard work to become reality, but investor confidence can produce fantastic dividends.

We’ve seen this in tourism: as the sector grows and events develop larger profiles, investor confidence leads to more hotel developments, bigger conferencing capabilities and, alongside those, job creation that offers our locals the opportunity to support families and grow in terms of skills development.

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Bo-Kaap or Langa. As locals, we feel pride at knowing our home is being showcased and, I’m certain, this kind of promotion attracts international visitors in much the same way that visiting the fountain that features in the opening credits of TV series Friends gets people motivated to book tickets to New York.

Tourism, like the film industry, is affected by seasonality, and events are central in providing year-round sustainability. We rely on fresh, innovative event concepts to ensure that visitors keep on coming.

The CTIFMF is at the heart of generating ongoing interest. The city’s capabilities when it comes to staging world-class events has grown hugely in recent years, with the Fifa World Cup 2010 being one of the main trampolines that bounced us on to the global stage. Culture, diversity, scenic venues and collaborative atmosphere will ensure that our reputation continues to grow.

Rafiq and team have a big challenge on their hands as their “what if” moment comes to life, but as a tourism body and, I’m certain, as a city, we’re behind them all the way.

* Enver Duminy is the chief executive of Cape Town Tourism.

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507728991209{padding-top: 75px !important;padding-right: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 75px !important;padding-left: 20px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-lg vc_hidden-md”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

What if Cape Town becomes the Cannes of Africa?

 

CAPE ARGUS / OPINION[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1454″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Ste George’s Mall, Bo-Kaap or Langa. This kind of promotion attracts international visitors, says the writer. Picture: Tracey Adams/ANA[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]Cape Town – Imaginative stories start with a “what if” moment – a proposition that propels the viewer into the perspective of the hero of the story. This is true of movies, and, in many ways, this is paralleled in truly creative business ventures. Such is the case of the Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) 2017.

From relatively humble beginnings in 2007 as the Cape Town and Winelands International Film Festival, the long-term vision of the event’s organisers has seen it grow an increasing reputation as the place to promote the film and television industry.

Every year the phrase “flock to Cannes” is used by the media to describe the mass migration of media specialists to the Cannes Film Festival. That’s a “what if” proposition for us in the Cape: what if our international profile on the film and television market could rival the very best, becoming the Cannes of Africa?

In generating global interest in a local event, we could see the benefits of the tourism that results being spread widely across the city, in the same way that it is through other large events and festivals. It takes a “Cannes-do” attitude!

This year’s CTIFM takes place from October12-21, and is all the more important as it’s headed by Rafiq Samsodien, a local from the Cape Flats who has not only had the honour of having produced an Oscar-nominated movie, he’s also immersed in the film industry where he works alongside some of the world’s best.

He’s gone on to champion the local film industry, and at every turn he’s proving to the world what we already believe: we’re capable and creative – asking those big “what if” questions and then using ingenuity and hard work to realise our dreams.

Staging a successful annual event isn’t easy; we can’t really say that an event grows like a snowball in our Cape context – a more effective metaphor would be to say that it is built brick by brick, year on year.

Success builds on success. Did the original organisers of what has now become the Cape Town International Jazz Festival ever believe that it would become the biggest event in the city’s calendar?

Perhaps that was their “what if” intention, it doesn’t really matter. Their hard work has translated to an event that attracts 34 000 festival attendees, generating a R553.4million economic injection into the local economy, creating 2 000 more temporary jobs than existed before it was around.

Similarly, Design Indaba (2014) proved that it could carry the clout to live up to expectations, with 25 000 expo delegates, 367 exhibitors and a R326m economic boost.

The Cape Town Cycle Tour this year attracted 4 000 international entries, and generated R500m towards the economy, according to tour organisers. A modest look at tourism spend says that an international visitor is enjoying the exchange rate: last year, the average international visitor spend, not including accommodation, came to R1 198 per day. They stayed for an average of three to four days, and some for much longer.

Research company Forward Keys has forecast a 14% increase year on year in arrivals to the city in October, when CTIFMF will take place (based on bookings), and many of those visitors will be here to enjoy what will be a remarkable event.

Earlier this year the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA) ranked Cape Town as the number one city in Africa for business tourism, and the City now ranks in the top 40 destinations for business tourism in the world – improving 15 places in the global rankings from 54th place in 2015 to 39th place last year.

According to a Grant Thornton economic assessment done as part of the bid process, hosting the Rugby World Cup in 2023 would bring South Africa R27.3 billion in direct, indirect and induced economic impact. It would also sustain 38 600 annual job equivalents – some temporary and some permanent.

Business, sport, film: all have this in common: “what if” propositions that have led to action, action that has collectively contributed billions to our economy every year. This is a cash injection that benefits all of us as it allows for continued infrastructural growth.

The film industry is built on immense sums of money, investors believe in projects that take hard work to become reality, but investor confidence can produce fantastic dividends.

We’ve seen this in tourism: as the sector grows and events develop larger profiles, investor confidence leads to more hotel developments, bigger conferencing capabilities and, alongside those, job creation that offers our locals the opportunity to support families and grow in terms of skills development.

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Bo-Kaap or Langa. As locals, we feel pride at knowing our home is being showcased and, I’m certain, this kind of promotion attracts international visitors in much the same way that visiting the fountain that features in the opening credits of TV series Friends gets people motivated to book tickets to New York.

Tourism, like the film industry, is affected by seasonality, and events are central in providing year-round sustainability. We rely on fresh, innovative event concepts to ensure that visitors keep on coming.

The CTIFMF is at the heart of generating ongoing interest. The city’s capabilities when it comes to staging world-class events has grown hugely in recent years, with the Fifa World Cup 2010 being one of the main trampolines that bounced us on to the global stage. Culture, diversity, scenic venues and collaborative atmosphere will ensure that our reputation continues to grow.

Rafiq and team have a big challenge on their hands as their “what if” moment comes to life, but as a tourism body and, I’m certain, as a city, we’re behind them all the way.

* Enver Duminy is the chief executive of Cape Town Tourism.

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]