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CTIFMF 2018: Create. Collaborate. Celebrate

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CTIFMF 2018:
Create. Collaborate. Celebrate

[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1625,1624,1626″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″][vc_column_text]“This year will see the birth of an entirely new way of collaborating and working towards a common goal for a sustainable industry. So let’s start by building meaningful partnerships that enable and empower the spirit of filmmaking and the filmmakers.” – CTIFMF Executive Chairman Rafiq Samsodien[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]Cape Town: The Cape Town International Film Market & Festival will take place from October 9th – 19th 2018 at venues across the V & A Waterfront as well as in select sites across the city of Cape Town.

The CTIFMF 2018 is a film industry platform to create, collaborate, and celebrate the exciting and often untapped potential of this eclectic industry. Guided by the festival’s core vision of transforming the African film industry through these the pillars of creation, collaboration, and celebration, the CTIFMF will be incorporating a host of key initiatives and projects aimed at the local and Pan-African film industries, film lovers across the city, as well as emerging and new audiences from across Africa and beyond.

CTIFMF Executive Chairman Rafiq Samsodien has the following to say of this year’s festival, “We are leading the charge to re-build this industry from the bottom up. This year will see the birth of an entirely new way of collaborating and working towards a common goal for a sustainable industry. So let’s start by building meaningful partnerships that enable and empower the spirit of filmmaking and the filmmakers.”

Create

Creation within the film industry is not limited to content, but extends to relationships too. For filmmakers, the creation of both content and relationships is essential. However, with mounting business, financial, and logistical challenges faced by filmmakers, it is harder than ever for them to focus on their core creative function.

The CTIFMF is in-and-of-itself a platform created to converge the African film industry at a single point at which these stakeholders will have unfettered access to create new business, persona,l and strategic relationships and opportunities.

Core programs at the CTIFMF 2018 will focus on supporting filmmakers in specific areas including the hosting a gathering of the Emerging Talent Labs from across Africa. The aim of this is to foster the launch of an African Film Institute, a partnership between Ouaga Film Lab (West), Maisha Film Lab (East), Carthage Pro (North) and Realness & Electric South (South), that will have a sizable footprint, real credibility, and extensive access to talent in all corners of the continent.

CTIFMF Marketing Director Jehad Kasu explains further “innovation is the cornerstone of the team’s endeavours to transform the landscape of the African film industry at the levels of ownership as well as industry stature. While some of what we are doing may have been done at other festivals before, the manner in which we are doing it within our platform is remarkably different. It is this difference in innovation that we trust will steadily build the CTIFMF to establish itself as Africa’s leading film industry platform.”

Collaborate

The African film industry needs collaboration. Supporting colleagues, promoting our own stories, and finding innovative solutions together in the face of adversity must be the hallmark of our industries. However, the South African film industry is largely very fractured and the emergence of a Pan-African industry is more dream than reality.

While competition is healthy, industry events and businesses that solely compete with one another, rather than complementing each other, makes for a situation that threatens the industry’s sustainability – let alone growth.

Collaboration means local collaboration with filmmakers, film schools, government, business, and other allied industry bodies such as tourism authorities, investors, and community organisations. Collaboration means a sharing of skills, an amplification of resources, and a support of people and organisations amongst the emerging filmmaker community.

To embody the spirit of collaboration, the CTIFMF is inviting the festival directors of some of Africa’s top film festivals to join together in a day of discussions, practical networking amongst filmmakers, and a sharing of award winning films.

This collaborative effort strives to enhance connectivity between South Africa and its African counterparts, to unlock co-production opportunities, identify synergies and provide traction to projects in the making.

Celebrate

The CTIFMF believes that celebrating our industry’s best and brightest is essential. Celebration is the best way to reward hard work and perseverance. Celebrating achievers is a way to highlight our stories and inspiring and motivating new talent.

This year the CTIFMF will celebrate local content from South Africa and Africa in public spaces through a series of public screenings that will be presented at the V&A Waterfront’s amphitheatre and beyond. Red carpet premieres and a host of related public events will ensure that the African narrative is celebrated throughout the year, and not just during the CTIFMF. “We are excited about making a landmark announcement on this component of our programme in coming weeks”adds Kasu.

The City of Cape Town’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security, Alderman JP Smith has this to say of this initiative, “The City of Cape Town is proud to be associated with the CTIFMF’s plan to revive the local film industry. Off the back of our successes, let us collaborate and build on these and tell our African stories, loudly andproudly. It is time to be up there on the global stage amid the big names of the world. The City will fully support the initiatives of the industry.”

Throughout this year’s CTIFMF the film industry, those hoping to enter the industry, and those who just love the movies will all have something to celebrate.

Continue to visit www.filmfest.capetown for updates as the festival approaches.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507810009772{padding-top: 20px !important;padding-right: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 20px !important;padding-left: 20px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-lg vc_hidden-md”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

CTIFMF 2018:
Create. Collaborate. Celebrate

[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1625,1624,1626″ columns=”6″][vc_column_text]“This year will see the birth of an entirely new way of collaborating and working towards a common goal for a sustainable industry. So let’s start by building meaningful partnerships that enable and empower the spirit of filmmaking and the filmmakers.” – CTIFMF Executive Chairman Rafiq Samsodien[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]Cape Town: The Cape Town International Film Market & Festival will take place from October 9th – 19th 2018 at venues across the V & A Waterfront as well as in select sites across the city of Cape Town.

The CTIFMF 2018 is a film industry platform to create, collaborate, and celebrate the exciting and often untapped potential of this eclectic industry. Guided by the festival’s core vision of transforming the African film industry through these the pillars of creation, collaboration, and celebration, the CTIFMF will be incorporating a host of key initiatives and projects aimed at the local and Pan-African film industries, film lovers across the city, as well as emerging and new audiences from across Africa and beyond.

CTIFMF Executive Chairman Rafiq Samsodien has the following to say of this year’s festival, “We are leading the charge to re-build this industry from the bottom up. This year will see the birth of an entirely new way of collaborating and working towards a common goal for a sustainable industry. So let’s start by building meaningful partnerships that enable and empower the spirit of filmmaking and the filmmakers.”

Create

Creation within the film industry is not limited to content, but extends to relationships too. For filmmakers, the creation of both content and relationships is essential. However, with mounting business, financial, and logistical challenges faced by filmmakers, it is harder than ever for them to focus on their core creative function.

The CTIFMF is in-and-of-itself a platform created to converge the African film industry at a single point at which these stakeholders will have unfettered access to create new business, persona,l and strategic relationships and opportunities.

Core programs at the CTIFMF 2018 will focus on supporting filmmakers in specific areas including the hosting a gathering of the Emerging Talent Labs from across Africa. The aim of this is to foster the launch of an African Film Institute, a partnership between Ouaga Film Lab (West), Maisha Film Lab (East), Carthage Pro (North) and Realness & Electric South (South), that will have a sizable footprint, real credibility, and extensive access to talent in all corners of the continent.

CTIFMF Marketing Director Jehad Kasu explains further “innovation is the cornerstone of the team’s endeavours to transform the landscape of the African film industry at the levels of ownership as well as industry stature. While some of what we are doing may have been done at other festivals before, the manner in which we are doing it within our platform is remarkably different. It is this difference in innovation that we trust will steadily build the CTIFMF to establish itself as Africa’s leading film industry platform.”

Collaborate

The African film industry needs collaboration. Supporting colleagues, promoting our own stories, and finding innovative solutions together in the face of adversity must be the hallmark of our industries. However, the South African film industry is largely very fractured and the emergence of a Pan-African industry is more dream than reality.

While competition is healthy, industry events and businesses that solely compete with one another, rather than complementing each other, makes for a situation that threatens the industry’s sustainability – let alone growth.

Collaboration means local collaboration with filmmakers, film schools, government, business, and other allied industry bodies such as tourism authorities, investors, and community organisations. Collaboration means a sharing of skills, an amplification of resources, and a support of people and organisations amongst the emerging filmmaker community.

To embody the spirit of collaboration, the CTIFMF is inviting the festival directors of some of Africa’s top film festivals to join together in a day of discussions, practical networking amongst filmmakers, and a sharing of award winning films.

This collaborative effort strives to enhance connectivity between South Africa and its African counterparts, to unlock co-production opportunities, identify synergies and provide traction to projects in the making.

Celebrate

The CTIFMF believes that celebrating our industry’s best and brightest is essential. Celebration is the best way to reward hard work and perseverance. Celebrating achievers is a way to highlight our stories and inspiring and motivating new talent.

This year the CTIFMF will celebrate local content from South Africa and Africa in public spaces through a series of public screenings that will be presented at the V&A Waterfront’s amphitheatre and beyond. Red carpet premieres and a host of related public events will ensure that the African narrative is celebrated throughout the year, and not just during the CTIFMF. “We are excited about making a landmark announcement on this component of our programme in coming weeks”adds Kasu.

The City of Cape Town’s Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security, Alderman JP Smith has this to say of this initiative, “The City of Cape Town is proud to be associated with the CTIFMF’s plan to revive the local film industry. Off the back of our successes, let us collaborate and build on these and tell our African stories, loudly andproudly. It is time to be up there on the global stage amid the big names of the world. The City will fully support the initiatives of the industry.”

Throughout this year’s CTIFMF the film industry, those hoping to enter the industry, and those who just love the movies will all have something to celebrate.

Continue to visit www.filmfest.capetown for updates as the festival approaches.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Call for Entries 2018

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Call for Entries 2018

[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1615″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]The registration booths at the 2017 festival.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

The 2018 Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) will take place from October 9th – 19th 2018. This year’s edition will build significantly on the successes of last year with an increased focus on collaboration and the celebration of the local, regional, pan-African, and international film industries.

Through various collaborations we will be supporting colleagues, promoting our own stories, and finding innovative solutions together, creating an enabling environment for growth and development for filmmakers across Africa.

The CTIFMF through a variety of programs that will be announced in the upcoming months will be the pivot on which we will endeavor to exponentially grow the distribution of African content across the world.

Having set itself the goal of leading the transformation of the film industry in Africa, the CTIFMF is excited to announce the first and most fundamental stepping stone to achieving this goal: the official opening of the call for film submissions for the CTIFMF 2018.

Filmmakers from all over the world are invited to submit their films in the following categories: feature films, documentary, animation and short films. We especially encourage producers, directors and script writers from South Africa and Africa who are creating local/African content to submit high quality entries into competition.

This year’s CTIFMF will present an exciting and diverse array of quality films that showcase the immense talent of filmmakers from the region, the country, the continent and beyond.

Only films completed not more than 18 months prior to the Call for Entries of the Cape Town International Film Market & Festival will be considered for competition purposes.

Films completed before this time will be eligible for screening in the Panorama Section but not considered for the competition section. Awards in the competition section are as follows:

FILM AWARDS
Grand Prix
Best Director
Best New Director
Best Actor
Best Actress
Best Script
Best Cinematography
Best Editing
Best Documentary Feature
Best Short Film
Best Animation Short Film
Best South African Feature Film
Best South African Short Film
Audience Award for Best Film at the Festival

Deadlines
May 1, 2018 Opening Date
July 10, 2018 Regular Deadline
July 31, 2018 Final Deadline
August 7, 2018 Notification Date
October 9 – 19, 2018 Event Date

Please visit the link below for the Entry Form, Rules & Regulations:

CTIFMF FILMFREEWAY

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507728991209{padding-top: 75px !important;padding-right: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 75px !important;padding-left: 20px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-lg vc_hidden-md”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

Call for Entries 2018

[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1615″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]The registration booths at the 2017 festival.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

The 2018 Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) will take place from October 9th – 19th 2018. This year’s edition will build significantly on the successes of last year with an increased focus on collaboration and the celebration of the local, regional, pan-African, and international film industries.

Through various collaborations we will be supporting colleagues, promoting our own stories, and finding innovative solutions together, creating an enabling environment for growth and development for filmmakers across Africa.

The CTIFMF through a variety of programs that will be announced in the upcoming months will be the pivot on which we will endeavor to exponentially grow the distribution of African content across the world.

Having set itself the goal of leading the transformation of the film industry in Africa, the CTIFMF is excited to announce the first and most fundamental stepping stone to achieving this goal: the official opening of the call for film submissions for the CTIFMF 2018.

Filmmakers from all over the world are invited to submit their films in the following categories: feature films, documentary, animation and short films. We especially encourage producers, directors and script writers from South Africa and Africa who are creating local/African content to submit high quality entries into competition.

This year’s CTIFMF will present an exciting and diverse array of quality films that showcase the immense talent of filmmakers from the region, the country, the continent and beyond.

Only films completed not more than 18 months prior to the Call for Entries of the Cape Town International Film Market & Festival will be considered for competition purposes.

Films completed before this time will be eligible for screening in the Panorama Section but not considered for the competition section. Awards in the competition section are as follows:

FILM AWARDS
Grand Prix
Best Director
Best New Director
Best Actor
Best Actress
Best Script
Best Cinematography
Best Editing
Best Documentary Feature
Best Short Film
Best Animation Short Film
Best South African Feature Film
Best South African Short Film
Audience Award for Best Film at the Festival

Deadlines
May 1, 2018 Opening Date
July 10, 2018 Regular Deadline
July 31, 2018 Final Deadline
August 7, 2018 Notification Date
October 9 – 19, 2018 Event Date

Please visit the link below for the Entry Form, Rules & Regulations:

CTIFMF FILMFREEWAY

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Marshall (SK)

[vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507713680392{padding-top: 75px !important;padding-right: 150px !important;padding-bottom: 75px !important;padding-left: 150px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-sm vc_hidden-xs”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner css=”.vc_custom_1507713693400{padding-bottom: 25px !important;}”][vc_column_text]

Marshall

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”1502″ size=”medium_large” align=”left” css=”.vc_custom_1507802769173{padding-bottom: 45px !important;}”][vc_column_text]Director: Reginald Hudlin
Country: United States (2017)
Running Time: 118 min[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1507802835635{padding-bottom: 45px !important;}”]

Synopsis

 

About a young Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American Supreme Court Justice, as he battles through one of his career-defining cases.

Director BIO

 

Reginald “Reggie” Alan Hudlin (born December 15, 1961) is a prolific American writer, director, and producer who has worked in both TV and in the movies. Along with his older brother, Warrington Hudlin, he is known as one of the Hudlin Brothers. From 2005 to 2008, Hudlin was President of Entertainment for Black Entertainment Television (BET). Hudlin has written numerous graphic novels, He co-produced the 88th Academy Awards ceremony in 2016 as well as other TV specials. Hudlin’s breakout film was 1990’s House Party. Hudlin has worked as a producer, most recently as a producer of Quentin Tarantino’s 2012 film, Django Unchained.[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/C_bfOWof0Sg” video_title=”1″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507802900191{padding-top: 20px !important;padding-right: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 20px !important;padding-left: 20px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-lg vc_hidden-md”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner css=”.vc_custom_1507713693400{padding-bottom: 25px !important;}”][vc_column_text]

Marshall

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][us_single_image image=”1502″ size=”medium_large” align=”left” css=”.vc_custom_1507802769173{padding-bottom: 45px !important;}”][vc_column_text]Director: Reginald Hudlin
Country: United States (2017)
Running Time: 118 min[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1507802835635{padding-bottom: 45px !important;}”]

Synopsis

 

About a young Thurgood Marshall, the first African-American Supreme Court Justice, as he battles through one of his career-defining cases.

Director BIO

 

Reginald “Reggie” Alan Hudlin (born December 15, 1961) is a prolific American writer, director, and producer who has worked in both TV and in the movies. Along with his older brother, Warrington Hudlin, he is known as one of the Hudlin Brothers. From 2005 to 2008, Hudlin was President of Entertainment for Black Entertainment Television (BET). Hudlin has written numerous graphic novels, He co-produced the 88th Academy Awards ceremony in 2016 as well as other TV specials. Hudlin’s breakout film was 1990’s House Party. Hudlin has worked as a producer, most recently as a producer of Quentin Tarantino’s 2012 film, Django Unchained.[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/C_bfOWof0Sg” video_title=”1″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

What if Cape Town becomes the Cannes of Africa?

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What if Cape Town becomes the Cannes of Africa?

 

CAPE ARGUS / OPINION[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1454″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Ste George’s Mall, Bo-Kaap or Langa. This kind of promotion attracts international visitors, says the writer. Picture: Tracey Adams/ANA[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]Cape Town – Imaginative stories start with a “what if” moment – a proposition that propels the viewer into the perspective of the hero of the story. This is true of movies, and, in many ways, this is paralleled in truly creative business ventures. Such is the case of the Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) 2017.

From relatively humble beginnings in 2007 as the Cape Town and Winelands International Film Festival, the long-term vision of the event’s organisers has seen it grow an increasing reputation as the place to promote the film and television industry.

Every year the phrase “flock to Cannes” is used by the media to describe the mass migration of media specialists to the Cannes Film Festival. That’s a “what if” proposition for us in the Cape: what if our international profile on the film and television market could rival the very best, becoming the Cannes of Africa?

In generating global interest in a local event, we could see the benefits of the tourism that results being spread widely across the city, in the same way that it is through other large events and festivals. It takes a “Cannes-do” attitude!

This year’s CTIFM takes place from October12-21, and is all the more important as it’s headed by Rafiq Samsodien, a local from the Cape Flats who has not only had the honour of having produced an Oscar-nominated movie, he’s also immersed in the film industry where he works alongside some of the world’s best.

He’s gone on to champion the local film industry, and at every turn he’s proving to the world what we already believe: we’re capable and creative – asking those big “what if” questions and then using ingenuity and hard work to realise our dreams.

Staging a successful annual event isn’t easy; we can’t really say that an event grows like a snowball in our Cape context – a more effective metaphor would be to say that it is built brick by brick, year on year.

Success builds on success. Did the original organisers of what has now become the Cape Town International Jazz Festival ever believe that it would become the biggest event in the city’s calendar?

Perhaps that was their “what if” intention, it doesn’t really matter. Their hard work has translated to an event that attracts 34 000 festival attendees, generating a R553.4million economic injection into the local economy, creating 2 000 more temporary jobs than existed before it was around.

Similarly, Design Indaba (2014) proved that it could carry the clout to live up to expectations, with 25 000 expo delegates, 367 exhibitors and a R326m economic boost.

The Cape Town Cycle Tour this year attracted 4 000 international entries, and generated R500m towards the economy, according to tour organisers. A modest look at tourism spend says that an international visitor is enjoying the exchange rate: last year, the average international visitor spend, not including accommodation, came to R1 198 per day. They stayed for an average of three to four days, and some for much longer.

Research company Forward Keys has forecast a 14% increase year on year in arrivals to the city in October, when CTIFMF will take place (based on bookings), and many of those visitors will be here to enjoy what will be a remarkable event.

Earlier this year the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA) ranked Cape Town as the number one city in Africa for business tourism, and the City now ranks in the top 40 destinations for business tourism in the world – improving 15 places in the global rankings from 54th place in 2015 to 39th place last year.

According to a Grant Thornton economic assessment done as part of the bid process, hosting the Rugby World Cup in 2023 would bring South Africa R27.3 billion in direct, indirect and induced economic impact. It would also sustain 38 600 annual job equivalents – some temporary and some permanent.

Business, sport, film: all have this in common: “what if” propositions that have led to action, action that has collectively contributed billions to our economy every year. This is a cash injection that benefits all of us as it allows for continued infrastructural growth.

The film industry is built on immense sums of money, investors believe in projects that take hard work to become reality, but investor confidence can produce fantastic dividends.

We’ve seen this in tourism: as the sector grows and events develop larger profiles, investor confidence leads to more hotel developments, bigger conferencing capabilities and, alongside those, job creation that offers our locals the opportunity to support families and grow in terms of skills development.

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Bo-Kaap or Langa. As locals, we feel pride at knowing our home is being showcased and, I’m certain, this kind of promotion attracts international visitors in much the same way that visiting the fountain that features in the opening credits of TV series Friends gets people motivated to book tickets to New York.

Tourism, like the film industry, is affected by seasonality, and events are central in providing year-round sustainability. We rely on fresh, innovative event concepts to ensure that visitors keep on coming.

The CTIFMF is at the heart of generating ongoing interest. The city’s capabilities when it comes to staging world-class events has grown hugely in recent years, with the Fifa World Cup 2010 being one of the main trampolines that bounced us on to the global stage. Culture, diversity, scenic venues and collaborative atmosphere will ensure that our reputation continues to grow.

Rafiq and team have a big challenge on their hands as their “what if” moment comes to life, but as a tourism body and, I’m certain, as a city, we’re behind them all the way.

* Enver Duminy is the chief executive of Cape Town Tourism.

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column css=”.vc_custom_1507728991209{padding-top: 75px !important;padding-right: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 75px !important;padding-left: 20px !important;}” offset=”vc_hidden-lg vc_hidden-md”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]

What if Cape Town becomes the Cannes of Africa?

 

CAPE ARGUS / OPINION[/vc_column_text][us_gallery ids=”1454″ columns=”1″ indents=”1″ img_size=”full”][vc_column_text]

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Ste George’s Mall, Bo-Kaap or Langa. This kind of promotion attracts international visitors, says the writer. Picture: Tracey Adams/ANA[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/2″][vc_column_text]Cape Town – Imaginative stories start with a “what if” moment – a proposition that propels the viewer into the perspective of the hero of the story. This is true of movies, and, in many ways, this is paralleled in truly creative business ventures. Such is the case of the Cape Town International Film Market and Festival (CTIFMF) 2017.

From relatively humble beginnings in 2007 as the Cape Town and Winelands International Film Festival, the long-term vision of the event’s organisers has seen it grow an increasing reputation as the place to promote the film and television industry.

Every year the phrase “flock to Cannes” is used by the media to describe the mass migration of media specialists to the Cannes Film Festival. That’s a “what if” proposition for us in the Cape: what if our international profile on the film and television market could rival the very best, becoming the Cannes of Africa?

In generating global interest in a local event, we could see the benefits of the tourism that results being spread widely across the city, in the same way that it is through other large events and festivals. It takes a “Cannes-do” attitude!

This year’s CTIFM takes place from October12-21, and is all the more important as it’s headed by Rafiq Samsodien, a local from the Cape Flats who has not only had the honour of having produced an Oscar-nominated movie, he’s also immersed in the film industry where he works alongside some of the world’s best.

He’s gone on to champion the local film industry, and at every turn he’s proving to the world what we already believe: we’re capable and creative – asking those big “what if” questions and then using ingenuity and hard work to realise our dreams.

Staging a successful annual event isn’t easy; we can’t really say that an event grows like a snowball in our Cape context – a more effective metaphor would be to say that it is built brick by brick, year on year.

Success builds on success. Did the original organisers of what has now become the Cape Town International Jazz Festival ever believe that it would become the biggest event in the city’s calendar?

Perhaps that was their “what if” intention, it doesn’t really matter. Their hard work has translated to an event that attracts 34 000 festival attendees, generating a R553.4million economic injection into the local economy, creating 2 000 more temporary jobs than existed before it was around.

Similarly, Design Indaba (2014) proved that it could carry the clout to live up to expectations, with 25 000 expo delegates, 367 exhibitors and a R326m economic boost.

The Cape Town Cycle Tour this year attracted 4 000 international entries, and generated R500m towards the economy, according to tour organisers. A modest look at tourism spend says that an international visitor is enjoying the exchange rate: last year, the average international visitor spend, not including accommodation, came to R1 198 per day. They stayed for an average of three to four days, and some for much longer.

Research company Forward Keys has forecast a 14% increase year on year in arrivals to the city in October, when CTIFMF will take place (based on bookings), and many of those visitors will be here to enjoy what will be a remarkable event.

Earlier this year the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA) ranked Cape Town as the number one city in Africa for business tourism, and the City now ranks in the top 40 destinations for business tourism in the world – improving 15 places in the global rankings from 54th place in 2015 to 39th place last year.

According to a Grant Thornton economic assessment done as part of the bid process, hosting the Rugby World Cup in 2023 would bring South Africa R27.3 billion in direct, indirect and induced economic impact. It would also sustain 38 600 annual job equivalents – some temporary and some permanent.

Business, sport, film: all have this in common: “what if” propositions that have led to action, action that has collectively contributed billions to our economy every year. This is a cash injection that benefits all of us as it allows for continued infrastructural growth.

The film industry is built on immense sums of money, investors believe in projects that take hard work to become reality, but investor confidence can produce fantastic dividends.

We’ve seen this in tourism: as the sector grows and events develop larger profiles, investor confidence leads to more hotel developments, bigger conferencing capabilities and, alongside those, job creation that offers our locals the opportunity to support families and grow in terms of skills development.

It’s a great experience to see a familiar landscape in a movie: household-name actors laying down a scene in Bo-Kaap or Langa. As locals, we feel pride at knowing our home is being showcased and, I’m certain, this kind of promotion attracts international visitors in much the same way that visiting the fountain that features in the opening credits of TV series Friends gets people motivated to book tickets to New York.

Tourism, like the film industry, is affected by seasonality, and events are central in providing year-round sustainability. We rely on fresh, innovative event concepts to ensure that visitors keep on coming.

The CTIFMF is at the heart of generating ongoing interest. The city’s capabilities when it comes to staging world-class events has grown hugely in recent years, with the Fifa World Cup 2010 being one of the main trampolines that bounced us on to the global stage. Culture, diversity, scenic venues and collaborative atmosphere will ensure that our reputation continues to grow.

Rafiq and team have a big challenge on their hands as their “what if” moment comes to life, but as a tourism body and, I’m certain, as a city, we’re behind them all the way.

* Enver Duminy is the chief executive of Cape Town Tourism.

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]